Re-Organizing the Binders

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After ALL the the work it takes to organize my binders each semester by week, and after I told all of you about how awesome that is, I decided to re-do it for my last semester. But don’t worry. If you are using the method I used, you might want to keep doing it that way.

I took all of my content from the first three semesters and put them in alphabetical order instead of by semester and week. Sounds like a lot of work, right? It was. It was kind of terrible, and I’m glad it is behind me now.

The reason I made the change? For the most part, I will only be reviewing content in my class this semester. Our program is designed to dig in deeper during the last semester with the content we learned in the first three semesters. We do this by working through massively long and excruciating painful case studies.

Since we use the content from previous semesters, it was important for me to be able to access that information easily. The old system wasn’t working for me anymore because I couldn’t remember what week or even what semester we went over cardiac. Plus, I am pretty sure that cardiac was covered in more than one class and in more than one semester.

Here are my binders before the mess began.

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I was too tired and crabby to take a picture of the mess. But just imagine paper…lots of paper…and no way to get around it. I was pretty much stuck finishing this project because I trapped myself in the dining room.

Basically, I took everything out of my binders and made a pile for topics beginning with “A” and another one for “B” and so on. I had separate lectures for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and EKG monitoring, so I put them all under the “Cardiac” tab and had smaller tabs for the individual topics. Same went for endocrine, neuro, GI, etc.

This is how I know where to find the content that I just spent hours organizing…

The front sleeve of each binder has a table of contents with the actual contents of that binder in bold lettering. Pretty handy.

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The sleeve on the spine of the binder has the first topic, last topic, and the number of the binder.

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Alright, it’s time to get back to care plans and case studies!

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